The hammered activist overcame the BBC Broadcasting House and began destroying the statue of Eric Gill

A protester was spotted with a hammer attack on a controversial statue created by the famous pedophile Eric Gill on the outside of the BBC Broadcasting House in central London.

The statute – Prospero and Ariel – was created by artist Eric Gill and activists have long demanded its removal. after it became clear that Gill had sexually abused his two eldest daughters.

His 1932-inspired statue, inspired by Shakespeare’s The Tempest, occupies a prominent position at the entrance to BBC Broadcasting House in Portland Place, London.

Police are watching an activist try to damage a statue of Eric Gill at the BBC Broadcasting House

Police are watching an activist try to damage a statue of Eric Gill at the BBC Broadcasting House

Officers demarcated the area because it is clear that the activist is trying to damage the statue

Officers demarcated the area because it is clear that the activist is trying to damage the statue

Metropolitan police said police officers were called to the Broadcasting House on Portland Street in Westminster around 4:15 p.m., where the man used a ladder to reach 10-foot-tall figures above the front entrance.

The guards closed the entrance to the building, and rescuers from the London rescue service also arrived.

A spokesman for Met said: “Police officers have taken part and remain in place, trying to intervene with the man.

“Another man was arrested on suspicion of conspiracy to damage another’s property.

Protesters are trying to damage a statue by sculptor Eric Gill

Protesters are trying to damage a statue by sculptor Eric Gill

The man appears to have used a ladder to reach the ten-meter statue and strike it with a hammer

After the protester damaged the statue, pieces of broken plaster are visible on the ground

After the protester damaged the statue, pieces of broken plaster are visible on the ground

Eric Gill: The Dark Side of the Famous Sculptor

  • In 1907, Eric Gill moved with his wife, Ethel Hester Moore, to Ditchling, Sussex, where he founded a community of bohemian artists.
  • In Sussex and at his later home in a ruined Benedictine monastery in Wales, he created life drawings for his daughters as they grew up.
  • He drew his daughter Petra, with whom he confessed sex, as a naked teenager in Girl In Bath
  • In his diary, published after his death, he described his fondness for bestiality and incest – with his sister and his daughters.
  • He had a number of affairs with models for his work

“Investigations are underway.”

A statue depicting Prosper and Ariel from Shakespeare’s The Storm was installed in 1933, according to the BBC.

A biography on the Tate Museum website states: “His religious views and subject matter contrast with his sexual behavior, including his erotic art, and (as reported in his own diaries) with his extramarital affairs and the sexual abuse of his daughters, sisters and dog. ‘

Nearly 2,500 people have previously signed a petition calling for the removal of a group of sculptures on the website of the political activist group 38 Degrees.

A BBC spokeswoman declined to comment.

The incident occurred a week after a jury sentenced four people to justice after they tore down a statue of slave trader Edward Colston.

A 17th-century bronze memorial was torn down during a Black Lives Matter protest in Bristol on June 7, 2020, before being thrown into the water, and those responsible were acquitted on January 5 after an 11-day trial in Old Bailey.

A video from today’s site showed that a cordon was placed in front of the Broadcasting House entrance, and police stood guard when a man who seemed to use a ladder to reach a ten-foot statue began pounding on it.

Pictured at work: Eric Gill carved the statue in 1933, when its abuse was still secret

Pictured at work: Eric Gill carved the statue in 1933, when its abuse was still secret

Pictured: Protester disguises a statue by sculptor Eric Gill with the words “Noose All Peados”

Pieces of stone on the floor after a man climbed the statues of Prospero and Ariel from Shakespeare's The Storm by sculptor Eric Gill in front of the BBC

Pieces of stone on the floor after a man climbed the statues of Prospero and Ariel from Shakespeare’s The Storm by sculptor Eric Gill in front of the BBC

Meanwhile, another man broadcast the incident live on social media before the police intervened.

Pieces of plaster were visible on the ground after they were chipped from the controversial statue.

Eric Gill was one of the most respected artists of the 20th century, when he died in 1940.

However, his diaries published in 1989 revealed that he regularly abused his daughters Betty and Petra, as well as the family dog.

The charities that survived the sexual abuse have long called for the removal of the statue, especially after the discovery of Jimmy Savile.

Gill’s other famous works include The creation of Adam, three stone bas-reliefs for the building of the League of Nations in Geneva in 1938 and the Gill Sans and Perpetua script, which he created in the late 1920s.

The BBC has been contacted for comment, but has previously stated that there are no plans to remove the statue.

The company has previously described the sculpture “as a metaphor for broadcast, performed by one of Britain’s leading artists of the last century, whose work has been widely exhibited in leading British museums and galleries.”

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