Novak Djokovic’s supporters are taking to the streets of Belgrade in support of the Serbian president’s accusations

Novak Djokovic’s supporters took to the streets of Belgrade in support of Serbian President accusing Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison of “political witch hunt”

  • Serbian President Aleksandar Vuchic described the Novak Djokovic saga as a “political witch hunt.”
  • Australian authorities accused of ‘tireless political persecution’ of world tennis number one Novak Djokovic
  • Aleksandar Vucic also drew Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s attention to the saga of exceptions
  • Australian Open defending champion will spend four days in a refugee hotel and could be deported on Monday

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Supporters of world tennis number one Novak Djokovic took to the streets in Belgrade today to show their support.

Djokovic could be deported from Australia on Monday after border forces denied him entry to Melbourne due to criteria for a vaccine exemption.

He now has another four days in a refugee hotel waiting to be deported on Monday.

Crowds of people – including members of Novak’s family – showed their support to the players and took to the streets of the Serbian capital.

In front of a crowd of angry people today in front of the National Assembly in Belgrade, Serbia, you can see a man with a large Serbian flag over his shoulders holding a large sign

In front of a crowd of angry people today in front of the National Assembly in Belgrade, Serbia, you can see a man with a large Serbian flag over his shoulders holding a large sign

Pictured: Srdjan Djokovič, the father of the world's number one tennis star, speaks with a megaphone in Belgrade today

Pictured: Srdjan Djokovič, the father of the world’s number one tennis star, speaks with a megaphone in Belgrade today

A large crowd gathered in the Serbian capital earlier today to demonstrate their resistance to the treatment of tennis star Novak Djokovic

A large crowd gathered in the Serbian capital earlier today to demonstrate their resistance to the treatment of tennis star Novak Djokovic

The speeches were delivered through megaphones, and people held up banners and Serbian flags as people spoke.

It comes after Serbian President Aleksandar Vučič fired on Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison, while the saga of the deportations of Novak Djokovic continues.

The tennis superstar could be expelled from the country next week after arriving in Melbourne for the upcoming Australia Open late Wednesday night before Border Force officials rejected her due to vaccination exemption criteria.

Djokovic will spend another four days in custody at a refugee detention hotel after a federal court adjourned his appeal to stay in Australia to Monday.

The Serbian president jumped on Djokovic’s defense and called on Mr Morrison, accusing the Australian authorities of a “political witch hunt”.

People can be seen cheering and raising their hands in the air when Srdjan Djokovič addressed them today in front of the National Assembly in Belgrade.

People can be seen cheering and raising their hands in the air when Srdjan Djokovič addressed them today in front of the National Assembly in Belgrade.

Novak Djokovic's family was among the crowd who spoke out about Djokovic's treatment in Australia

Novak Djokovic’s family was among the crowd who spoke out about Djokovic’s treatment in Australia

Novak Djokovic's parents Dijan and Srdjan were seen today in front of the National Assembly in Belgrade during a demonstration.

Novak Djokovic’s parents Dijan and Srdjan were seen today in front of the National Assembly in Belgrade during a demonstration.

Novak Djokovic's hopes of defending his Australian Open title are at stake after authorities denied his vaccination exemption.

Novak Djokovic’s hopes of defending his Australian Open title are at stake after authorities denied his vaccination exemption.

“What is not fair play is a political witch-hunt by everyone, including the Australian prime minister, who pretends that the rules apply to everyone,” Mr Vučič said on Thursday.

He claimed that other tennis stars had been allowed to enter Australia with medical exceptions, but that two unnamed players now face additional scrutiny.

According to Tennis Australia chief Craig Tiley, out of 26 players and support staff who applied for an exemption to participate in the grand slam, only a handful were accepted.

The Serbian president described Djokovic’s treatment as “infamous in the right sense of the word.”

Defending the title at the Australian Open star and her quest to become the best male tennis player of all time seems to be in ruins if his appeal is not successful a week after the Melbourne Park Grand Slam.

Serbian President Aleksandar Vucic (pictured December 21) described the Australian authorities' treatment of Djokovic as a political witch hunt.

Serbian President Aleksandar Vucic (pictured December 21) described the Australian authorities’ treatment of Djokovic as a political witch hunt.

Fans gathered in front of a quarantine facility on Thursday night, where Novak Djokovic is being held (pictured)

Fans gathered in front of a quarantine facility on Thursday night, where Novak Djokovic is being held (pictured)

“I am afraid that this tireless political persecution of Novák will continue until they can prove something, because if you cannot defeat someone, then you will turn to such things,” said Mr. Vučič.

The Serbian authorities have already been in contact with the Australian ambassador Prime Minister Ana Brnabic hopes to reach out to a senior member of Australia’s Home Affairs Department.

Mr. Vučič was also in contact with As a 20-time Grand Slam champion, Djokovic spends Orthodox Christmas alone and in custody.

“I told our Novak that the whole of Serbia is with him and that our authorities are taking all measures to stop harassing the best tennis player in the world as soon as possible,” Vučič wrote on Thursday.

“What is not fair play is a political witch hunt, which everyone, including the Australian Prime Minister (pictured on Thursday), pretends that the rules apply to everyone,” Mr Vučič said on Thursday.

Novak Djokovic's supporters sang songs and lit candles in front of the refugee detention hotel where he currently resides (pictured on Thursday)

Novak Djokovic’s supporters sang songs and lit candles in front of the refugee detention hotel where he currently resides (pictured on Thursday)

“In accordance with all standards of public international law, Serbia will fight for Novak Djokovic, for justice and truth.”

The Serbian newspaper Novosti criticized the abolition of visas as hypocritical, while the Informer media described it as “tyranny”.

“The police treat Novak like he’s the biggest TERRORIST,” the right-wing boulevard said.

In Australia, dozens of fans and Serbian Australians stepped up in the rain to gather for a candlelight in front of a quarantine hotel in Melbourne, where Djokovic is being held.

Many were wrapped in Serbian flags, singing songs and holding signs committing themselves to the world’s number one, while the abundant police presence watched.

Serb supporter Novak Djokovic holds a banner at the hotel where the tennis champion is to be housed in Melbourne (pictured from Thursday night)

Serb supporter Novak Djokovic holds a banner at the hotel where the tennis champion is to be housed in Melbourne (pictured from Thursday night)

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