Police reopen the case 51 years after Muriel McKay’s murder

The Metropolitan Police reopened the case of a woman who had been abducted from her home in Wimbledon on December 29, 1969.

Muriel McCay was abducted by Nizamodeen and Arthur Hosein, who thought they had married the wife of media mogul Rupert Murdoch.

Instead of kidnapping, then-25-year-old Anna Murdoch abducted the wife of Murdoch’s deputy, Alick McCay.

Muriel McKay was abducted from her Wimbledon home on December 29, 1969, after she was mistaken for Anna Murdoch, the 25-year-old wife of media mogul Rupert, and later died.

Muriel McKay was abducted from her Wimbledon home on December 29, 1969, after she was mistaken for Anna Murdoch, the 25-year-old wife of media mogul Rupert, and later died.

Nizamodeen and Arthur Hosein thought they would kidnap Rupert Murdoch's then-wife Anna Murdoch, pictured here in 1988

Nizamodeen and Arthur Hosein thought they would kidnap Rupert Murdoch’s then-wife Anna Murdoch, pictured here in 1988

Muriel McKay's family (pictured in January 1970) pressures police to dig up the farm where she is allegedly buried in an effort to find her remains.

Muriel McKay’s family (pictured in January 1970) pressures police to dig up the farm where she is allegedly buried in an effort to find her remains.

Nizmodeen Hosein protested that he did not kill McKay, instead claiming that she collapsed and later died of a heart attack while sitting down on the farm (pictured)

Nizmodeen Hosein protested that he did not kill McKay, instead claiming that she collapsed and later died of a heart attack while sitting down on the farm (pictured)

The Hosein brothers have been convicted of her murder, but police have yet to recover her body.

Nizamodeen approached Mrs. McCay’s family to tell them where the body was buried.

City police have now confirmed that they are investigating the case.

A spokesman for Scotland Yard told MailOnline:

“Officers from Met’s specialized criminal headquarters have met with the family and are checking all the material.”

According to The Times, detectives traveled to the Kew National Archives today to obtain the original case files.

Nizmodeen said: “There are wooden gates on the farm, there are several wooden gates, he has a barn next door, a barn next door and ten feet forward, ten feet on this side [left]’body is somewhere around’

Nizamodeen (right) and Arthur Hosein (left) were convicted of her murder, although police never found McKay's body

Nizamodeen (right) and Arthur Hosein (left) were convicted of her murder, although police never found McKay’s body

Nizamodeen claimed that no violence was used during the abduction. He said Mrs. McCay died watching the abduction report.

He and his brother demanded £ 1 million for Mrs. McCay’s safe return.

The couple were sentenced to life imprisonment after a trial in 1970. The brothers were among the first people to be convicted of murder despite their absence from the body.

Nisamadoeen informed the family that Mrs. McCay’s remains had been buried on an 11-acre farm in Hertfordshire.

The Times reported that the current owners of the farm did not allow the family to deploy a special ground radar on the spot.

Depending on the evidence, the Met Police may decide to launch a search for Mrs. McCay’s remains.

Her daughter Dianne McCay said: “We are glad the police take it seriously. We’ve been working hard the last few months to get that far, and we just want to keep doing it.

“It’s very frustrating because we didn’t talk about anything else and now Nizam has told us where he buried my mother, and now we have to stop and wait. It is very complicated.

“Christmas was painful because they took it then. The whole period of Christmas and New Year is always extremely sensitive for us, because it is the anniversary when we last saw each other, plus the horror of what happened next. “

Mrs. McCay’s daughter said there were certain protocols to follow, although using ground-based radar is relatively simple.

Nizmodeen, 75, has now uncovered the place where McKay was buried, a lawyer representing her family, and put pressure on the police to dig up the site to find her remains.

He also claimed that McKay had died of a heart attack while watching the report of her abduction two days after the start of the 40-day ransom.

He confessed after being tracked down in Trinidad in August by documentary filmmakers who discussed the story, despite maintaining his innocence.

The couple claimed to be innocent, but Arthur’s fingerprints were found on the ransom and a notebook filled with the same paper on which Muriel’s letters were written was discovered.

Nizmodeen told Matthew Gayle, a British lawyer from Trinidad hired by the family, that he wanted to “close” before he died, thus revealing the location of McKay’s body.

He said: ‘There are wooden gates on the farm, there are several wooden gates, there is a barn next to it, next to the barn and ten feet forward, ten feet on this side [left], the body is somewhere around.

Nizmodeen (above), 75, has now revealed the place where McKay was buried, a lawyer representing her family.

Nizmodeen (above), 75, has now revealed the place where McKay was buried, a lawyer representing her family.

“Next to the barbed wire fence, about three feet.” [from the fence]. ‘

Muriel was abducted after the brothers watched Rolls Royce with a driver belonging to Murdoch, who was lent to her husband, Alick McKay.

She was abducted at Volvo Brothers and taken to Rooks Farm, where they lived with Arthur’s wife and children who were on vacation at the time.

The head of the newspaper, McKay, returned home and found a phone ripped from the wall and the contents of his wife’s purse scattered down the hall.

He was later called by a man who demanded £ 1 million – equivalent to today’s £ 20 million – if Muriel was to be returned alive, sparking the first major ransom kidnapping case in the UK.

During the 40 days of suffering, the brothers, who claimed to be a mob group called M3, sent three letters and made another 18 calls, demanding money.

They also sent McKay’s husband five letters allegedly written by Muriel, including one stating that she was cold and blindfolded, as proof of life.

Two police attempts to deliver counterfeit notes to the kidnappers failed, but a second attempt led police officers to Rook’s Farm, where Muriel was taken by the brothers.

Nizmodeen told the lawyer that he was the only person to bury McKay and refused to implicate his brother Arthur, who was also convicted of her murder.

He also protested that he had not killed McKay, but instead claimed to have collapsed and later died of a heart attack while sitting down on the farm.

“This will haunt me forever for the rest of my days,” Nizmodeen said, adding that McKay had fed “fried rice” after kidnapping it. His brother Arthur died in prison in 2009.

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