King’s College London refuses to revoke Hong Kong Minister of Justice’s hardline

King’s College London refuses to withdraw its award for Hong Kong Minister of Justice in the hard line despite a call from its OWN academics

  • King’s College refused to withdraw a university scholarship for Teresa Cheng
  • He is behind the arrests of journalists and pro-democracy activists in Hong Kong
  • More than 20 academics from King’s College Law School have written to Lord Geidt to withdraw their membership.
  • But King’s leaders wrote that they refused to take away Mrs. Cheng’s honor










The university, funded by millions in Chinese cash, has refused to take the honor of Hong Kong’s justice minister on the hard line despite a desperate call from its own academics.

King’s College London has repeatedly refused to withdraw its prestigious university scholarship for Teresa Cheng, who is behind the arrest of journalists and pro-democracy activists in Hong Kong.

More than 20 academics from King’s College Law School have written to Lord Geidt in his role as chairman of the university’s board of directors to ask for Ms. Cheng’s membership to be revoked.

However, after more than a year, King’s executives wrote back to academics that they had refused to withdraw the award, arguing that Ms. Cheng’s “considerable work” in supporting former students had guaranteed the award.

Last week, Ms. Cheng, who was sanctioned by the US government for its role in suppressing democratic rights in Hong Kong, launched a tirade against “appalling” foreign politicians and organizations, who called for the release of journalists in the region.

King's College London has repeatedly refused to withdraw its prestigious university scholarship for Teresa Cheng (pictured), who is behind the arrests of journalists and pro-democracy activists in Hong Kong.

King’s College London has repeatedly refused to withdraw its prestigious university scholarship for Teresa Cheng (pictured), who is behind the arrests of journalists and pro-democracy activists in Hong Kong.

King’s refusal to remove Mrs. Cheng from the honors comes despite bosses apologizing to employees last April who complained about a university film commemorating the death of Prince Philip because of his “history of racist and sexist comments.”

And in 2019, the university withdrew an honorary doctorate from the Sultan of Brunei after his country imposed a penalty for homosexuality by stoning.

Eva Pils, a law professor at King’s, who was one of those who called for the removal of Ms. Cheng’s award, said the university’s response was “not convincing.”

She added: “Personally, I feel very uncomfortable and consider it a complete shame that she is still appreciated in this way. “I teach students from Hong Kong and I am aware of what they have just been through.

He obviously bears the responsibility. Ms Cheng’s campaign to remove the medal began in 2019, when she was a leading figure in the drafting of the extradition law, which sparked protests in Hong Kong.

King’s is estimated to have thousands of Chinese students paying millions in cash, while since 2019 it has received £ 660,874 from controversial telecom giant Huawei.

Conservative MP Sir Iain Duncan Smith (pictured) said: “The fact that King’s cannot in any way condemn someone like Teresa Cheng for her role in the crackdown on peace democracy fighters is utterly hypocritical.”

Conservative MP Sir Iain Duncan Smith said: “The fact that King’s cannot in any way condemn someone like Teresa Cheng for her role in the crackdown on peace democracy fighters is utterly hypocritical.

“As for a serious matter of great importance, because they are so completely on the dragonflies in China, they do not dare say a word.”

Luke de Pulford, a human rights activist who launched the campaign, said: “It is a sad disgrace to see a once large institution fighting for weak excuses to celebrate a notorious tyrant just to keep China happy.”

A spokeswoman for King’s College said: “After careful consideration and recognition of the strength of the political situation in Hong Kong, King’s College London’s Governing Board has decided not to remove the FKC received by Ms. Cheng as contributions for which the awards remain a matter of course.”

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