Airbnb owners in rural areas may need a license to offer their homes as short-term vacations

Airbnb owners in rural communities may need to obtain a license to offer their homes, as short-term vacations overcome fears that locals are expelled due to a lack of rental properties.

  • Owners of a second home may need a permit to manage short-term vacations
  • The proposal is being considered after MEPs’ concerns in popular coastal locations
  • This is the result of an announced crackdown on people abusing the tax gap in holiday homes
  • Holiday rentals must be rented for at least 70 days a year at business prices










Airbnb owners in rural communities may need to obtain a license to offer their homes as short-term vacations due to fears that locals are being pushed out due to a lack of rental properties.

The proposal, which the ministers are considering, could force the owners of second homes to obtain the consent of the local council to the administration of short-term holidays.

The plan follows conservative MPs in popular coastal locations, including Cornwall, Devon and the Isle of Wight, raising concerns about a thriving industry leading to a shortage of affordable housing in their area.

A government source told The Times: ‘Clearly, we need to respond to how the market develops.’

The settlement ministry announced yesterday a tax crackdown on homeowners who “pretend” to rent their properties to vacationers.

From April 2023, holiday flats must be rented for at least 70 days a year in order to be subject to commercial rates under the new rules, which are aimed at benefiting tourist destinations.

The proposal, which ministers are considering, could force second-hand owners to obtain approval from the local council to manage short-term holidays (pictured: St Ives in Cornwall)

The proposal, which ministers are considering, could force second-hand owners to obtain approval from the local council to manage short-term holidays (pictured: St Ives in Cornwall)

Selaine Saxby, a Conservative MP for North Devon, warned during the Commons debate that rising home prices had contributed to making people in her community homeless.

She also said that ‘noise, antisocial behavior, parties and hot tubs’ on Airbnb cause local anxiety.

And Bob Seely, a Tory MP for the Isle of Wight, said the village of Seaview was “truly deprived of permanent life,” as 82 percent of properties are second homes.

Referring to the latest developments, Leveling Up Minister Michael Gove said: “The government supports small businesses, including responsible short-term rentals, which attracts tourists and brings significant investment to local communities.

“However, we will not stand by and allow people in privileged positions to abuse the system by unfairly claiming tax breaks and letting local people calculate the costs.

“The action we are taking will create a fairer system to ensure that other homeowners contribute their share of the local services they benefit from.”

The Ministry of Raising yesterday announced a tax crackdown on homeowners who “pretend” to rent their properties to vacationers (Settlement Secretary Michael Gove in a January 10 photo)

Kurt Jansen, Director of Tourism Alliance, added: “The tourism industry welcomes the setting of these new operating thresholds for self-catering businesses, as it makes a very important distinction between commercial self-catering businesses that provide income and employment for local communities. and holiday homes, which are empty most of the year.

“It is a recognition that tourism is the lifeblood of many small towns and villages and maintains the viability of local shops, pubs and attractions.”

Between 2018 and 2019, three per cent of households in the United Kingdom said they had a second home, a share that has not changed since 2008-09, according to the Department for Leveling Up.

The most common reason to have a second home is to use it as a vacation home or weekend cottage, while 35 percent said it considered it a long-term investment or income, and 16 percent once used it as their previous home.

An Airbnb spokesman said: “We take housing issues seriously and we have already submitted proposals to the government for a national registration system for hosts” (file photo)

Overall, 57 per cent of second homes are in the UK, while 34 per cent in Europe and nine per cent in non-European countries, according to the latest figures.

The UK Government’s Housing Survey 2018-19 states: “Since 2008-09, there has been an increase in the proportion of second homes in the United Kingdom and a corresponding decrease in European and non-European second homes.”

An Airbnb spokesman said: “Most hosts share space in their own home and almost a third say additional income is an economic lifeline.

“We take housing seriously and we have already submitted proposals to the government for a national registration system for hosts. We look forward to supporting the forthcoming consultation. “

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