Novak Djokovic is back in immigration custody before visa clearing – as big rival Rafael Nadal

Novak Djokovic was seen returning to immigration custody after his visa was revoked again as top players fumbled for the unvaccinated champion.

Djokovic was spotted on Saturday afternoon driving to the Park Hotel in Carlton, Melbourne, where he must stay until his appeal is heard in federal court on Monday morning.

He spoke with immigration officials at an unknown location on Saturday at 8:00. The border authorities then detained Djokovic on the basis of a court agreement.

Djokovic’s lawyers then submitted their statements during an online hearing of the Federal Court, presided over by Judge David O’Callaghan at his attorneys’ office at 10:15 p.m.

Djokovic was taken to the Park Hotel in Carlton, Melbourne on Saturday afternoon, where he must stay until his appeal to a federal court is heard on Monday morning (pictured Djokovic in the back seat of a car returning to an official detention center on Saturday)

Djokovic was taken to the Park Hotel in Carlton, Melbourne on Saturday afternoon, where he must stay until his appeal to a federal court is heard on Monday morning (pictured Djokovic in the back seat of a car returning to an official detention center on Saturday)

Media and protesters gather in front of a notorious hotel in a detention center where an unvaccinated Serbian tennis star is housed (pictured, car returning to Novak Djokovic returns to the Park Hotel in Melbourne)

Media and protesters gather in front of a notorious hotel in a detention center where an unvaccinated Serbian tennis star is housed (pictured, car returning to Novak Djokovic returns to the Park Hotel in Melbourne)

Pro-refugee protesters gathered at the Carlton Hotel, to which Djokovic was taken on Saturday.  The hotel is famous for supporters of asylum seekers (pictured, protesters and media in front of the Park Hotel in Melbourne)

Pro-refugee protesters gathered at the Carlton Hotel, to which Djokovic was taken on Saturday. The hotel is famous for supporters of asylum seekers (pictured, protesters and media in front of the Park Hotel in Melbourne)

His crack legal team is expected to have a harder time working with the last visa ban lifted than it did on January 10, when an Australian border official first detained him.

The Serbian superstar remains the center of global attention and a magnet for passionate debates about health, science, politics and immigration.

Anti-vax supporters and anti-immigration detention protesters gathered in Rod Laver’s arena and in front of the infamous detention center, where some asylum seekers have been housed for years.

At the tennis stadium, 200 vaccine protesters chanted “free Novak” and “let him play,” as well as various slogans against vaccinations and mask accusations.

Young US Open champion Emma Raducan said the scandal had become a distraction

Young US Open champion Emma Raducan said the scandal had become a distraction

Novak's big rival Rafa Nadal said no one was bigger than the Australian Open

Novak’s big rival Rafa Nadal said no one is bigger than the Australian Open

Djokovic was seen arriving in the back seat of a white sedan as he re-entered the detention center in a green tracksuit and white mask.

When the Australian Open’s best player got back into custody, a rival seeking a record 21 grand slam titles, Spaniard Rafael Nadal, admitted his irritability over his focus on the Serbian superstar.

“Honestly, I’m a little tired of that situation because I just believe it’s important to talk about our sport, tennis,” Nadal said.

“There is no player in history who is more important than the event, is there? [It] it will be a great Australian Open with or without him. “

Novak Djokovic (pictured with his wife) is fighting for his 21st grand slam title, surpassing the legends of Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal.

Novak Djokovic (pictured with his wife) is fighting for his 21st grand slam title, surpassing the legends of Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal.

Tsitsipas, defeated by Djokovic (pictured) last year in the French Open final, said Serbia’s world number one was “playing by its own rules”

Player number four in the men’s draw, Greek Stefanos Tsitsipas condemned Djokovic for making his vaccinated teammates “look crazy.”

“Statistics say that 98 percent of players were vaccinated and did what they had to come and play and play in Australia,” Tsitsipas told India’s WIO News.

“A very small group has decided to go their own way, and most of it looks like they’re all crazy or something.”

Meanwhile, brilliant young US Open champion Emma Raducan said on Saturday that the scandal was a distraction.

“I feel like it took a little away from the great tennis that took place in Australia this summer … like it’s a distraction.”

She believed that people lacked the performances of other stars that deserved attention, such as the returning Brit Andy Murray.

Key reasons for Djokovic’s visa waiver were revealed on Saturday with Minister Alex Hawk, who said his presence in Australia could “boost vaccination sentiment.”

Hawke announced on Friday that he had revoked the visa of the Serbian tennis star for the second time, giving a long list of reasons, including that Djokovic had shown “obvious negligence” for isolation after a positive test.

Key reasons for Novak Djokovic’s visa waiver were unveiled with Immigration Minister Alex Hawk, who said his presence in Australia could “boost vaccination sentiment”

Court documents show why Mr Hawke revoked Djokovic's visa

Court documents show why Mr Hawke revoked Djokovic’s visa

Djokovic also posed “a risk to the good order of the Australian community,” Mr Hawke said, as his stay in Australia could cause a “public disturbance” to the values ​​of Australian society.

Immigration Minister Alex Hawke (pictured) revoked Djokovic's visa for the second time.  The Serbian star is fighting deportation

Immigration Minister Alex Hawke (pictured) revoked Djokovic’s visa for the second time. The Serbian star is fighting deportation

“I believe that Mr Djokovic’s continued presence in Australia could lead to an increase in the anti-vaccination sentiments generated in the Australian community, potentially leading to an increase in civil unrest of the kind previously experienced in rallies and protests, which in themselves can be a source of community broadcasting, “said Mr Hawke, as seen in the court documents.

The drama surrounding the Novak Djokovic affair is to be captured in docuseries, which will be a tennis version of Drive To Survive.

Sportsmail understands that the crew is already in Australia and is filming what was the most explosive start to the tennis season in recent years, thanks to the fiasco that surrounded the world number one.

Usually disparate governing stakeholders in the sport have teamed up to support and approve a new project that will eventually be broadcast on Netflix.

AUSTRALIAN OPEN EPIC VISA SAGA NOVAK DJOKOVICE

Novak Djokovic’s title defense at the Australian Open remains in doubt after Australian immigration officials revoked his visa for the second time.

Here’s how the saga evolved:

January 4: Djokovic said on Twitter that he was on his way to the Australian Open on the basis of a medical exception. He writes on Instagram: “I spent a fantastic quality time with my loved ones during the break and today I am heading down with an exception. Let’s go to 2022 !! ‘

January 5: Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison warns Djokovic that he will be on the “next plane home” if his medical exemption is considered insufficient, and he is adamant that Djokovic will not receive preferential treatment.

January 5: Djokovic’s visa is revoked upon arrival in Melbourne. The Australian Border Forces announces that the player “has not provided adequate evidence to meet Australia’s entry requirements”.

January 6: Djokovic is sent to the Park Hotel in Melbourne after his visa was refused. It will initiate an appeal, which is adjourned until January 10. Serbian President Aleksandar Vucic says Djokovic is the victim of “persecution”.

January 9: Djokovic’s lawyers claim he was granted a vaccination exemption to enter Australia because he passed a positive test on Covid-19 in Serbia on December 16. However, social media contributions suggest that he participated in a number of social events in the days after his apparent diagnosis.

January 10: Djokovic’s visa waiver was revoked by Judge Anthony Kelly, who ordered the Australian government to pay the court costs and released Djokovic from detention within half an hour. Djokovic says he is “pleased and grateful” and wants to “stay and try to compete”.

January 11: Djokovic’s defense of the title remains in doubt, as the Australian Immigration Minister is considering whether to go beyond the court’s decision, allegedly because of Djokovic’s alleged misleading claim in his application regarding his movement within 14 days before his arrival in Australia.

January 12: Djokovic admits that he made a “mistake in his judgment” by interviewing a French journalist when Covid was positive. He adds that although he took part in a children’s tennis event the day after the test, he did not receive notification of a positive test until after the event.

January 13: Djokovic will face Serb Miomir Kecmanovic in the first round.

January 14: Immigration Minister Alex Hawke is revoking Djokovic’s visa for the second time, saying in a statement that it was “for health reasons and order.”

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