A North Carolina motorist (51) shot a black biker in an attack on the road

Roger Dale Nobles Sr., 51 (pictured), was charged with first-degree murder after he shot a black motorcyclist from his pickup truck on Monday while his son was arguing with the victim outside the vehicle.

Roger Dale Nobles Sr., 51 (pictured), was charged with first-degree murder after he shot a black motorcyclist from his pickup truck on Monday while his son was arguing with the victim outside the vehicle.

A white North Carolina motorist has been charged with first-degree murder for allegedly shooting a black biker in a roadside attack.

Roger Dale Nobles Sr., 51, allegedly fired a shotgun from the driver’s seat of his pickup at 32-year-old military veteran and father of three children, Stephen Addison, who was arguing with his son Roger Nobles Jr. intersection.

The bullet whizzed past Nobles Jr., who didn’t flinch or react, and hit Addison in the chest.

Nobles Jr. then he got back into his father’s 1992 Chevy and his father calmly waited for the green light to come out of the Fayetteville junction of Skibo and Cliffdale Roads, according to WRAL.

Nobles Sr. was arrested as soon as he returned home after the incident, and is now charged with first-degree murder. His son was also taken into police custody and interrogated after his father’s actions did not seem to surprise him.

Prosecutors may also consider hate charges after a neighbor claimed that Nobles Sr. she had racial abuse in the past, allegedly called her an n-word and got her “hell.”

Scroll down to the video

Roger Nobles Jr., left, is pictured arguing with Stephen Addison, 32, right, just before a motorcyclist was shot on the road by Roger Nobles Sr.

Roger Nobles Jr., left, is pictured arguing with Stephen Addison, 32, right, just before a motorcyclist was shot on the road by Roger Nobles Sr.

Security analysts who watched the video said Nobles Jr.  he knew his father was planning to shoot Addison.  They pointed out that the shooter's son didn't flinch at the shot and seemed to stand up to give his father a clear shot.

Security analysts who watched the video said Nobles Jr. he knew his father was planning to shoot Addison. They pointed out that the shooter’s son didn’t flinch at the shot and seemed to stand up to give his father a clear shot.

The victim Stephen Addison in the picture was the father of three children and an army veteran

The victim Stephen Addison in the picture was the father of three children and an army veteran

“He was driving around my yard and taking pictures of me on the porch,” said Shahara’s neighbor Chance.

“He fired a pistol into the air and told me to turn down the music. “I went through hell with that man,” she said, adding that he had been harassing her for years.

District Attorney Bill West told WRAL that “if the evidence justifies this type of allegation, [a hate crime is] definitely something we would look at and move on. ”

According to public records, Nobles Jr., who is 25 years old in the shooting footage, does not back down after his father pulls the trigger. Security analysts who reviewed the video said his reactions, along with his attitude toward his father’s window, indicated that his father was about to shoot Addison.

Anthony Waddy, an analyst at SAV Consulting, said Nobles Jr. He “cleared the way” for his father to fire a fatal blow.

What is a “mortal funnel”?

A “fatal funnel” is what law enforcement refers to as a door or lookout point where the target is easy to see and difficult for them to dodge.

“Where it actually stands in connection with what we call in the military, ‘a fatal funnel,'” Waddy told WAL. “He’s clearly out of danger.”

“The most surprising part of the video is what Waddy says didn’t happen,” says WRAL.

“Nobles Jr. he looked at Addison as he fell to the ground, but did not turn to his father and did not look surprised. Nobles Jr. he also provided no assistance to Addison, who eventually died of his injuries.

Neighbors said police included the Nobles as soon as they entered the driveway on Auburn Street.

“They handcuffed them and then it worked,” said one neighbor. “They started searching the truck.”

Nobles Sr. confessed to the shooting, but did not offer the motive to the police. He is currently being held in the Cumberland County Jail without custody.

Nobles Jr. he has not yet been charged with the incident, although he was originally taken into custody by the police.

Counsel Daniel Meier told WRAL that there was probably not enough evidence to charge Nobles Jr. from the crime, unless the prosecutors prove that he knew his father would shoot – he was not required by law to call the police and provide medical care to Addison. after he was shot or reported to his father.

Addison (pictured) was described by friends as a 'big, loving soul'

Addison (pictured) was described by friends as a ‘big, loving soul’

Nobles Jr.  (pictured) has not yet been charged with the incident, although he was originally taken into custody by police

Roger Nobles Jr.  on the left he was arguing with 32-year-old Stephen Addison in front of the car when they were stopped at a traffic light.  His father, Roger Nobles Sr., on the right, shot him from the driver's seat

Nobles Jr. (left and right with his father) has not yet been charged with the incident, although he was originally taken into custody by the police

After Addison was shot, Nobles Jr.  he returned to his father's 1992 Chevy (pictured) and his father waited until the green light came on to leave.

After Addison was shot, Nobles Jr. he returned to his father’s 1992 Chevy (pictured) and his father waited until the green light came on to leave.

“You have no obligation to report a crime, even if you know the person who committed it,” Meier told the newspaper. “You can watch the crime take place right in front of you, and you don’t have to call the police.”

To be Nobles Jr. accused of complicity in the murder, he would have to help destroy the evidence or cover up the homicide.

Justin Cockrell, Addison’s best friend, who served with him at Fort Bragg Army Reserve, said the victim was a “great, loving soul.”

‘[He was] loving and caring guy for everyone. He stayed away [and] he never worked with anyone, “Cockrell said to WAL.

Cockrell said that in the Fayetteville community, ‘not a bad word will be said about Stephen’ and that he felt he had ‘lost a friend for nothing’.

“It’s just nonsense,” Cockrell said. “It’s 2022 and we’re still talking about road rage. I mean, come on. Why did I lose my brother? He has three children … he is a veteran and has served in the military. ”

admin

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *